Welcome to the SR20 Community Forum - The Dash.
Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    See Rule #5 - HTFU!
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: Johnson City, TN
    Posts: 3,315
    Feedback Score: 22 (100%)

    Default How To: Properly create a crimped butt connection

    We all know soldering is arguably the best type of connection but sometimes we get lazy and want to quick wire something up. I'm doing this for one specific member that LOVES wire crimps, but mostly for everyone elses benefit as well who may not know the proper way of doing this.

    Step one:



    Gather your supplies. There are different size connections for different sized wire. Be sure to have the correct one on hand otherwise it isn't as good of a connection.

    Strip wire back on wire your wire you want to connect one end to. Be sure its not too much as you run the risk of the wire being exposed if there is too much insulation off the wire.

    Step two:



    Grab butt connection. Locate the split inside the connection (see the red marking in the picture). This is VERY important as it allows our connection to hold tightly. I have tried this many other ways and the best way is explained below.

    Step three:



    Insert butt connector into pliers as shown with the split in the butt connection AWAY from the pointed part of the pliers. Place wire into connection and squeeze tightly to crimp connection.

    Final Result:



    This is a properly done wire connection that should hold very tightly forever. To double check this, grab the connection with one hand and the wire with the other. Pull away from each other.

    You can now tape or shrink wrap this connection to further protect it.

    Happy connecting!
    04 Subaru FXT
    https://www.paypal.me/blairellis/5
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremiah 29:11
    "For I know the plans I have for you," declares the LORD, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future."

  2. #2
    ¿quémazda?
    User Info
    Join Date: Mar 2009
    Location: DFW, Texas
    Posts: 410
    Feedback Score: 1 (100%)

    Default

    Good writeup - I've botched these a lot (at-home stereo installs). I ultimately went to the posilocks my brother had lying around. They are also just really convenient AND you can reuse them if ever necessary (like upgrading/replacing an inferior or missing head unit) later on. F-ing awesome.
    "Es mejor morir de pie que vivir arrodillado" - Emiliano Zapata

    My car has 1 too few pedals.

  3. #3
    THE SE- RLOGIST
    User Info
    Join Date: Mar 2009
    Location: Boston Ma
    Posts: 3,141
    Feedback Score: 25 (100%)

    Default

    Some times the simple write ups are some of the best ones.

  4. #4
    The People's Mod
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: Columbia, SC
    Posts: 17,925
    Feedback Score: 16 (100%)

    Default

    You missed the final step. Hint: your crimping tool has a position closest to the fulcrum for a reason.

  5. #5
    MoreNuttyThanASquirlTurd
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: Madison, WI
    Posts: 3,006
    Feedback Score: 48 (100%)

    Default

    There are 2 dies for a reason. The one you used is for uninsulated connectors, the other one is for insulated connectors which is the one you should have used. What happens when you use the one you did is you stretch out and can even puncture the insulation then it is no good. You can us that one if you plan on heat shrinking each connection which also keeps out water and dirt.
    92 Infiniti G21 - 242 WHP & 182 Ft-LBs (Mustang Dyno) - NA 88mm 12.5:1 VE, N1 cams, Xcessive Intake, Q45 TB, Mazworx Header, 3" Exhaust, Nismotronic ECU on MAP and IAT.
    View The Build Here

  6. #6
    See Rule #5 - HTFU!
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: Johnson City, TN
    Posts: 3,315
    Feedback Score: 22 (100%)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BenFenner View Post
    You missed the final step. Hint: your crimping tool has a position closest to the fulcrum for a reason.
    Care to tell what you mean? This is all I've ever done with crimps outside of taping or heat shrinking them.

    Quote Originally Posted by squirlz View Post
    There are 2 dies for a reason. The one you used is for uninsulated connectors, the other one is for insulated connectors which is the one you should have used. What happens when you use the one you did is you stretch out and can even puncture the insulation then it is no good. You can us that one if you plan on heat shrinking each connection which also keeps out water and dirt.
    I agree 100% that you CAN puncture the insulation when doing it this way. HOWEVER, I have still yet to puncture one. If I did, I would cut it off and do it again. The outer covering is pretty resiliant.
    04 Subaru FXT
    https://www.paypal.me/blairellis/5
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremiah 29:11
    "For I know the plans I have for you," declares the LORD, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future."

  7. #7
    The People's Mod
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: Columbia, SC
    Posts: 17,925
    Feedback Score: 16 (100%)

    Default

    With your method of putting the split away from the pointy part when you crimp might eliminate the need for the last step.

    I put the split towards the pointy end, then finish off the crimp with the oval shape on the pliers. Make sure the dimple is facing either towards the fulcrum or directly away from it before you "sandwich" the crimp with the oval section.

    This has given me my most consistent crimps in the past. It also covers your ass if you happen to poke through the insulation in the previous step.

  8. #8
    See Rule #5 - HTFU!
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: Johnson City, TN
    Posts: 3,315
    Feedback Score: 22 (100%)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BenFenner View Post
    With your method of putting the split away from the pointy part when you crimp might eliminate the need for the last step.

    I put the split towards the pointy end, then finish off the crimp with the oval shape on the pliers. Make sure the dimple is facing either towards the fulcrum or directly away from it before you "sandwich" the crimp with the oval section.

    This has given me my most consistent crimps in the past. It also covers your ass if you happen to poke through the insulation in the previous step.
    Care to post a picture of what you are talking about? I guess I'm a bit fuzzy on what your trying to say. My appologies.
    04 Subaru FXT
    https://www.paypal.me/blairellis/5
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremiah 29:11
    "For I know the plans I have for you," declares the LORD, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future."

  9. #9
    The People's Mod
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: Columbia, SC
    Posts: 17,925
    Feedback Score: 16 (100%)

    Default

    I can't get any pics up right now.

    Put the split towards the pointy part of the crimp tool (opposite of what you recommend) and crimp as usual.

    This will produce a dimple in the insulation and metal part of the connector squeezing the wire in place. Take the connector and put it back into the pliers but this time bring it all the way inside the pliers to the last section of the tool (it looks like an oval when the tool is closed). Make sure that the dimple in the connector is facing "out" before you crimp again. When I say facing "out" I mean if you point the pliers up towards the ceiling when you crimp, make sure the dimple is facing up towards the ceiling as well.

    When you're done the dimple should be mostly closed up. That last step is what most people skip. Don't skip this step!

    Give it a try and let me know if it's any better than your previous method.
    Last edited by BenFenner; 02-15-12 at 09:36 AM.

  10. #10
    Member
    User Info
    Join Date: Feb 2008
    Posts: 233
    Feedback Score: 0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by arcangel187 View Post
    Good writeup - I've botched these a lot (at-home stereo installs). I ultimately went to the posilocks my brother had lying around. They are also just really convenient AND you can reuse them if ever necessary (like upgrading/replacing an inferior or missing head unit) later on. F-ing awesome.
    i would not use those posi locks if it was to save my life, you cant even see the quality of the connection inside. im an electrician by trade and i solder everything a soldering iron and roll of solder is so cheap like why use anything else. but back to those things i would rather just strip twist and tape a connection than use those
    GOT TORQUE??? GET HERE :poke:
    www.torque-irl.com

  11. #11
    ¿quémazda?
    User Info
    Join Date: Mar 2009
    Location: DFW, Texas
    Posts: 410
    Feedback Score: 1 (100%)

    Default

    I stand corrected. In my experience the way they screwed together mashed the exposed wire tightly against the metal cone and didn't slip out at all when I tugged on them pretty hard. Also,you could leave one end connected (and thus protected from your goofy ass accidentally blowing a fuse) while you strip/prep the other wire you're putting to it. I had no issues with them. However, I won't argue against a good solder as the best connection. I just happen to really suck at them and these presented a decent option.
    "Es mejor morir de pie que vivir arrodillado" - Emiliano Zapata

    My car has 1 too few pedals.

  12. #12
    I have an inventory!
    User Info
    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Posts: 3,331
    Feedback Score: 22 (100%)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by damienga15de View Post
    i would not use those posi locks if it was to save my life, you cant even see the quality of the connection inside. im an electrician by trade and i solder everything a soldering iron and roll of solder is so cheap like why use anything else. but back to those things i would rather just strip twist and tape a connection than use those
    solder and engine vibration = bad news bears - I would solder AND maurette, then electrical tape the base further down the wires if I was that hardcore, but butt connectors and heat shrink tubing do well for this application.

  13. #13
    The People's Mod
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: Columbia, SC
    Posts: 17,925
    Feedback Score: 16 (100%)

    Default

    Facebook album permalink (in case the images don't show up in the future).

    Okay Blair! Three years later, and I've got those pics for you.

    This is how I crimp a butt connector. This same method applies if you leave the plastic sheath on, but for my demonstration I used heat shrink instead.















    This is where my method is different. I use the pointy end on the split in the connector.


    Even if you get the most horrible looking crimp, you're still in the clear because of the next step.


    This is the important next step.


    One side done.


    The other side.


    Again, this is key.


    Try to tug that wire out. I dare you.






    If it had the plastic sheath on there, you'd be completely insulated by this time. Even minor breaks in the insulation get covered up during the last step.


    You didn't forget to slide the heat shrink on earlier did you?






    One more for good measure.


    Last edited by BenFenner; 03-07-13 at 10:59 AM.

  14. #14
    Car at stalemate
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: Levittown, Pennsylvania, United States
    Posts: 643
    Feedback Score: 0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BenFenner View Post

    no offense but this should be made known that this is possibly the WORST way to do wiring. NEVER EVER put all your solders/butt/crimp connections in the same place, it makes for 1 huge unmanageable bulge. these types of things are always better off to be staggered as to cut down on the mass. Also i am 1 of those people who are mostly against crimps/butts.
    Last edited by BenFenner; 04-17-12 at 02:42 PM. Reason: Moved soldering advice to other thread.
    Quote Originally Posted by Your Mom
    You are Perfect

  15. #15
    The People's Mod
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: Columbia, SC
    Posts: 17,925
    Feedback Score: 16 (100%)

    Default

    eno I hope you don't mind I moved your soldering advice to the only soldering advice thread we have right now (which needs work obviously). You mind if we keep this thread only about crimping please?

  16. #16
    The People's Mod
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: Columbia, SC
    Posts: 17,925
    Feedback Score: 16 (100%)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by enohand View Post
    no offense but this should be made known that this is possibly the WORST way to do wiring. NEVER EVER put all your solders/butt/crimp connections in the same place, it makes for 1 huge unmanageable bulge. these types of things are always better off to be staggered as to cut down on the mass.
    No offense taken. You'll be very glad to hear I've been staggering my joints for a very long time now and I've echoed the same advice on many occasions. It is worth repeating though.

    It is hard to see, but that joint is staggered from the other one. Maybe not enough for my liking, but it was a rare instance where the length of wire didn't lend itself to more stagger (I wanted the most shielding possible and I'd have to have removed shielding to get a better stagger), and it was a very light part of the wiring harness with plenty of other scrimps staggered all around it which gave me nowhere else to go. If you keep watching my thread for updates I hope you'll find the staggering to your liking.

    Quote Originally Posted by enohand View Post
    Also i am 1 of those people who are mostly against crimps/butts.
    I'm pretty sure there is a different thread for this argument. I'll look for it.
    Edit: Here it is. You should post in here. Wiring Splicing Tips? Solder vs Butt Connector
    Last edited by BenFenner; 04-18-12 at 10:13 AM.

  17. #17
    Car at stalemate
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: Levittown, Pennsylvania, United States
    Posts: 643
    Feedback Score: 0

    Default

    yeah not problem...

    reading that over , i sound kinda like a dick, sorry about that

    Quote Originally Posted by Your Mom
    You are Perfect

  18. #18
    The People's Mod
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: Columbia, SC
    Posts: 17,925
    Feedback Score: 16 (100%)

    Default

    I know that feel bro. No sweat.
    Last edited by BenFenner; 04-18-12 at 10:19 AM.

  19. #19
    old and dirty.. and dirty
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: Fishers, IN
    Posts: 3,262
    Feedback Score: 24 (100%)

    Default

    To negate the OP, sorry Blair, but a solder connection is not as good as a high quality splice. In Naval/Marine Avionics school, they taught us to use splices, but not the cheap splices one can buy at Napa, we're talking aviation grade splices with the correct crimp tool. It's a more reliable connection (can't muscle it apart with force) and provides better continuity.

  20. #20
    SR20 Inquirer
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Location: NJ
    Posts: 1,123
    Feedback Score: 9 (100%)

    Default

    ^^^this...is the same for the AF...matter of fact we use the same book


  21. #21
    OEM Plus.
    User Info
    Join Date: Dec 2007
    Posts: 11,172
    Feedback Score: 52 (100%)

    Default

    Strangely enough, at my current job, I learned that a proper crimp connection just plain works.

 

 

LinkBacks (?)


Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Back to top